Tag Archives: Aging

On Being an Old Lady

Birthday chocolates

Photo by Monique Carrati on Unsplash

I try hard not to be an old lady!

By which I mean, I work at staying open to the changing world around me, making it a point to view the world with interest even in the midst of amazement.  I take care to refrain from criticizing change just because it is . . . well, change.  Just because the world has come to be so different from the one I grew up in.

My daughter, my daughter-in-law, my grandchildren, younger friends, all keep guiding me gently through multiple bewilderments.  Especially my daughter.  Especially the bewilderments that come with social media.

I am on social media primarily because my presence there reminds my readers that I’m not dead, that I’m still producing those rather old-fashioned things call books.  Truth be told, though, one of the marks of my old-ladyness is that other people do my posting for me, a service I am grateful for.

But occasionally I do post something myself, especially birthday greetings.  It’s one of the pleasures of social media to be reminded of birthdays and to be able to send my greetings so simply.  I’ve even learned how to pull up a pretty background to accompany my Happy Birthdays.  And the first time I managed to do that, I can tell you I was proud!

Standing so far outside today’s popular culture has its hazards, though, and every now and then those hazards catch up with me.  Recently, when I sat down at my computer, Facebook reminded me that it was my son-in-law’s birthday.  Of course!  I thought.  And I fired off a Happy Birthday.  Then I went looking for a background to highlight my message to someone I care about.

I found one.  The world in which the images float is brown, but not an unattractive brown.  And perhaps, I noted, brown is more fitting for a man—in a very traditional way—than the usual pastels.  The floating images against this backdrop are brown, too.  They look like a cross between Hershey’s kisses and the curly top of a soft-serve ice cream cone.

Perfect! I said to myself.  Everybody loves chocolate!

And I clicked my greeting into life and went on about my morning.

Until my daughter called.  “Did you know,” she said, “that you sent poop emojis to Terry for his birthday?”

Photo by Nicole Honeywill on Unsplash

No.  Of course, I didn’t know.

And then, to add insult to injury, I had to ask her to take time out of her busy morning to walk me through the process of deleting my well-intended message!

Sometimes old-ladyness is just what it is, no matter how hard I try.

And how grateful I am to have a daughter to watch over and rescue me!

Home

I’ve never felt so old!

Of course, I’ve never been so old, but then everyone can say that, even a six-year-old.  We are always, on any day, the oldest we have ever been.

The difference, I suppose, is that today I know I’m old.  I know it in my bones.  And I understand in a way I never have before what knowing something in my bones means.

The reason for this surge of new understanding?  I’ve just moved.

Age precipitated the move.  For most of the last decade I have been renting a lovely, two-story house with a tuck-under garage which made it a three-story house when I carried groceries or laundry up from the basement.

I’ve never had a problem with stairs.  I saw stairs as good exercise built into my day.  My partner’s and my bedrooms and my study were all on the second floor and the laundry room was in the basement along with the garage, so I was happily up and down those stairs many times every day.

Or at least I was happy until some stress in my lumbar spine began to cause occasional leg weakness.  When I found myself holding both banisters and pulling myself up the stairs very slowly, I began to reconsider.

We looked at senior residences, but I didn’t feel ready.  Yes, I know I’m eighty. I should be ready, but I’m not.  Even though I began my career in the corner of a bedroom, I couldn’t imagine giving up my study, and senior residences with two bedrooms and a usable study are almost impossible to find.  Besides, giving up a house is giving up having my own private patch of the outdoors on the other side of my door.  And that patch of outdoors feeds my soul.

So we began looking.  We began more than a year ago actually with a very patient realtor.  But we couldn’t get on the same page and nothing that we saw was quite . . . it.  Until, finally, it was.  The house we’d dreamed came onto the market in the afternoon.  We let our realtor know we wanted to see it now.  We spent twenty minutes walking through.  Then we leapt.

And we’ve been landing ever since.

We got the house, the loan, the movers.  We got the boxes and the tape and the enormous rolls of bubble wrap.

And we started packing.

And sorting.  I spent two days sorting through the files in my study, more than forty years worth of professional files and personal ones, too, such as a forgotten treasure-trove of letters surrounding my son’s death.  Then I spent more days sorting and culling books.

And packing.

And sorting.

And packing.

Until the day came when everything went onto a truck except for us and Sadie, our one-eyed sheltie.

It all came off the truck and we were here!

And we were so, so tired.

And I, at least, suddenly knew myself to be old.  Very, very old.

But today, at last, my study is up and working.  No pictures on the walls yet, but I sit here at my familiar keyboard with three yellow tulips in a purple vase at my side and a new yard yet to be explored stretching beyond my window.  And I am so glad to be 80 and looking ahead to the all-on-one-floor future, however long or short it may be.

And I am glad, once more, to gather words and see them appear on the screen before me.  This is it, my heart says.  I am home.

And I am.

I am.

Old Age

Photo by Cristian Newman on Unsplash

Old age is a ceremony of losses.

Donald Hall

On Growing Older . . . Old

Credit: KellyP42 | morguefile.com

Why is “older” an acceptable word and “old” almost forbidden?

To answer my own question, I suppose it’s because we’re all growing older, even the four-year-old next door.  But old . . . at least in this youth-driven society, old smacks of incompetence, of irrelevance.  Even worse, old smacks of that truly obscene-to-us word . . . death.

I am approaching my birthday this month.  It won’t be a “big” dividable-by-five birthday, but still one that feels significant for the number it stands close to.  In a week I will be 79.

Can you name the number?

Forty didn’t trouble me a bit.  I had a friend, somewhat older than I, who, when I turned forty, said, “Forty is such a fine age.  It’s the first number you reach that has any authority, but you still feel so young.”  And she was right!  I sailed into 40 feeling mature, confident . . . and still young.

Sixty-five slipped past without much fanfare.  As a working writer I wasn’t facing retirement, after all.  Moreover, I could sign up for Social Security, and for the self-employed that is no small thing.  I’d been paying in, both the employee and the employer side, for a long time, and at last it was going to come back to me.  Given the difficulty and expense of buying health insurance that isn’t handed down through an employer, being able to get Medicare was an even bigger deal.  (I will never understand the flap in this country about “socialized medicine.”  That’s what Medicare is, and it works!  It works better than any other pay-for-care system offered in this backward country.)

When I turned seventy my daughter threw me a big party . . . at my request, I should add.  It was a lovely party, and it exhausted me.  Mostly it reminded me that I’ve never liked parties.

“I won’t ask you to do that again,” I said.

She, who has always been a loving and willing daughter, said, “Good!”

But this is 79!  And yes, I might as well name the number.  Eighty is a very short hop, skip and hobble down the road!

For the first time I find myself facing changes in my body that I know I don’t have the power to fix.  Not that I’ve given up trying.  I walk vigorously two or three times a day.  I do Pilates three times a week.  I stretch and I meditate and I eat healthfully and I practice excellent sleep hygiene.  Actually, my sleep hygiene is better and more reliable than my sleep. But my body continues on its ever-so-predictable downward trajectory.

From time to time, bits fall off.

And my mind?  That’s harder to define and even harder to talk about.  I can still produce a workable manuscript.  I can still offer a useful critique of someone else’s manuscript, too.  But I find myself too often going back to the refrigerator to locate the eggs I’ve just set out on the counter or struggling in the evening to remember some detail of what I’ve done that morning.

My omelets still please the palate, though, and I’ve shown up wherever I was expected to be in the morning and done whatever I said I would do.

Arriving at a place called old in this culture is a matter for some amazement.  Who is ever prepared?  After all, old has never been something to aspire to . . . despite the alternative.  A friend said recently, “I went from wolf whistles to invisibility in a heartbeat.”  And I went from “cutting-edge” to “veteran author” in the same incomprehensibly short time.

I find I want more than anything else to use these years I’ve been gifted, however many or few they may be.  I want to use them to deepen my acceptance of my own life, blunders and accomplishments all.  I want to use them to enrich the peace my presence brings into a room.

I want to use these years to live.  Not just to move through my days stacking accomplishments, one on top of another. I have enough of those.  We all have enough of those.

I want to use these years to breathe, deeply and mindfully.  And now, being old, I want use these final years to be grateful for every, every breath.

There is no need to be afraid of death

Credit: JasonGillman | morguefile.com

There is no need to be afraid of death. It is not the end of the physical body that should worry us. Rather, our concern must be to live while we’re alive – to release our inner selves from the spiritual death that comes with living behind a façade designed to conform to external definitions of who and what we are. Every individual human being born on this earth has the capacity to become a unique and special person unlike any who has ever existed before or will ever exist again… When you live as if you’ll live forever, it becomes too easy to postpone the things you know that you must do. You live your life in preparation for tomorrow or in remembrance of yesterday, and meanwhile, each day is lost. In contrast, when you fully understand that each day you awaken could be the last you have, you take the time that day to grow, to become more of who you really are, to reach out to other human beings.
                                                                                                 Elisabeth Kubler-Ross